Super Modern Off Grid Tiny House – Full Tour

Patrick and Thomas from the Rewild Homes Team built the Blue Heron tiny house to be completely off-grid with a Morso wood stove, 6 x 285 Watt solar panels, rainwater collection, and a Separett composting toilet.

The house is built on a 24 foot, 2 axle trailer, and it measures approximately 200 square feet.

The roof is gabled, which is a slightly more expensive design than a shed slope roof, but it allows for headroom on both sides of the sleeping loft.

Instead of a ladder, Rewild Homes has been getting lots of requests from their clients for stairs, so they’ve incorporated storage drawes, and they also used the space to store the large solar battery bank above the axles since the batteries weigh close to 1000 lbs.

The solar power system is very large for a tiny house, and they did this primarily because they wanted to run the refrigerator on solar power. They use propane to heat water and for the cooktop.

For ventilation, they have an industrial style ceiling fan to circulate heat and air, and they have a hood fan above the stove, and a vent in the bathroom to help keep humidity levels down.

The exterior of the home is cedar, which can withstand the damp British Columbia climate.

Thanks for watching!

Mat & Danielle

Man Builds Stunning Off Grid Shipping Container Home on Mountain Top

Adam from HoneyBox ( ) built this stunning off-grid shipping container cabin on top of a mountain in British Columbia, Canada.

The cabin is built with 3 x 20 foot shipping containers. The middle container is bolted to a cement block foundation using twist locks, and the two outer containers are cantilevered using lashing rods.

He designed the cabin to take full advantage of the panoramic mountain view by covering almost an entire wall with windows, although he admits this is not the most energy efficient design.

He’s got 800 Watts of solar panels to power his 12-volt system for lights, outlets, and a water pump. He has a wood stove for heat, propane for the fridge, hot water, and cooktop, and he has a composting toilet from Sun-Mar.

For water, he has a well and a rainwater catchment system, and he uses both to fill 2 large water tanks for showering and washing dishes but he doesn’t yet have a filter for the rainwater and the well water is ferrous so he brings in drinking water for now.

One of the main challenges of building with shipping containers is trying to avoid water leaks along the seams where the containers are joined together. Once the clamps are in place, there’s a 3 inch gap between containers. Adam installed a mechanical gutter along the seams on the roof to divert water off the roof, and he has a second gutter underneath it to catch any leaks from the first gutter. So far he hasn’t had any water issues. You can avoid leaks by building a roof over the containers.

The cabin is insulated with spray foam insulation, which adheres to the steel walls and helps avoid condensation problems that might arise with fibreglass batts.

Adam built this structure as a studio to demonstrate one of the many ways that shipping containers can be used to create unique living spaces. He doesn’t live in it full-time.